True Religion

Knowing God Truly

Calvin's Institutes

A few days ago we looked at how we might gain true knowledge of ourselves and of God. Today we look at what true knowledge of God looks like. We can see the need for this kind of thinking if we will but look at the lives of those who claim to know God yet regularly live as if he doesn’t exist, doesn’t care, or is just so in love with us that he will overlook any fault because that is just who he is.

But Calvin wants us to see that we cannot say that “God is known where there is no religion or piety.” “Religion and piety? That sounds pretty formal and probably something that none of us want. Religion is something most of us are tired of. And piety – that stopped being something people wanted in the 90’s (the 90’s of a long forgotten century). But by “religion” Calvin means holy devotion and faithfulness to God. And of piety he describes as “reverence joined with love.” So where God is truly known holy devotion and a reverence joined with love will increase. This is what Calvin is driving at when he says

“What help is it, in short, to know a God with whom we have nothing to do? Rather, our knowledge should serve first to teach us to fear and reverence; secondly, with it as our guide and teacher, we should learn to seek every good from him, and, having received it, to credit it to his account. For how can the thought of God penetrate your mind without your realizing immediately that, since you are his handwork, you have been made over and bound to his command by right of creation, that you owe your life to him? – that whatever you undertake, whatever you do, ought to be ascribed to him?. . . Again, you cannot behold him clearly unless you acknowledge him to be the fountainhead and source of every good.”

So what in the end does true knowledge of God produce in our lives? 

“Here indeed is pure and real religion: faith so joined with an earnest fear of God that this fear also embraces willing reverence, and carries with it such legitimate worship as is prescribed in the law.”

And unless we make the mistake of thinking that reverence and love for God is found best in religious rites or traditions, Calvin warns us to reconsider.

“And we ought to note this fact even more diligently: all men have a vague general veneration for God, but very few really reverence him; and wherever there is great ostentation in ceremonies, sincerity of heart is rare indeed.”

That last line is powerful for us to think on for it applies to every one of us. Ostentation – the desire to be front and center – is a temptation for many. And it is often mistaken for love for God when it is combined with religious rites and words. But over the top God-talk that draws attention to the “spirituality” of the speaker doesn’t exactly resemble the Christ who humbled himself to the point of death – even death on the cross. And the kind of empty ostentation that Calvin speaks of here is a danger to every church as well. Churches that emphasize rituals, ceremony, rites, and traditions can often fall into this pit. But this is no less a danger to modern churches where lights, drums, the carefully sculpted hipster look and feel, combined with fun and exciting programs for the whole family reign supreme. Different type of ostentation but still of a kind.

This is not meant to blast your church or accuse anyone. This is simply a reminder that the true remedy for dead religion and empty ostentation is the true knowledge of God. Humble and holy devotion combined with reverent fear and love for God must be the heart-beat of our lives. May this be true whether you wear a suit and tie or a graphic tee.

Oh… and by the way. You can order Calvin’s Institutes here if you want.

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